Slideshows

7 Lucky Works of Art

Chinese culture considers peaches very lucky, symbolizing longevity and good fortune. This bowl from the Qing dynasty (about 1700) certainly shows that the peach has stood the test of time! // Bowl, China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), about 1700. Porcelain with overglaze enamels. Gift of Mrs. Helen Hudgens in memory of her husband Mr. James W. Hudgens. 1998.18. While horseshoes are considered symbols of luck in our eyes, this horseshoe is used as currency in Nigeria. // Horseshoe shaped currency token, Benin Kingdom, Nigeria. Bronze. 107.1999. The BMA is lucky to call itself the home of the largest collection of Wedgwood outside of England. We couldn’t get through this list without sharing a little bit of green – it is St. Patrick’s Day, after all! // Vase, Meissen porcelain manufactory, est. 1710. Meissen Germany, 1818. Hard-paste porcelain with enamel decorations and gilding. Collection of the Art Fund, Inc. at the BMA. Purchase in honor of Donald M. James, Chairman of the Board, 2002-2005, AFI7.2005. Hotei is a Buddhist folk character who supposedly lived in China during the early 10th century. He is now worshipped in Japan as the God of Good Fortune. // Hotei sculpture, Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), about 1750. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett G. Bretz. This vase is adorned with bats, a classical Chinese feng shui symbol for prosperity, and clouds, which symbolize good fortune and happiness. // Vase with bats and clouds direction, China, porcelain with underglaze and blue and red decorations. 2002.62. This piece is an elaborate covered wedding food box. Eating foods from these plates on a wedding day leads to a long, happy marriage. // Wedding Food Box, Xiaoshan Family, China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 19th century. Collection of the Art Fund, Inc. at the BMA. Gift of Bayard Shields Tynes and Carolyn Dickinson Tynes. AFI37.2009.1A-B-.5.1-.4. The treasure under this rainbow is our beautiful sculpture garden! Rain or shine, this Sol LeWitt piece is always brightening our day. // "Bands of Color in Various Directions," Sol LeWitt, American (1928-2007), 2001. Vinyl on aluminum. Collection of the Art Fund, Inc. at the BMA. Purchase with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. John Poynor and Bluff Park Art Association in honor of the Museum's 50th anniversary. AFI2.1999.1. Copyright The LeWitt Estate/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York.
<
>
The treasure under this rainbow is our beautiful sculpture garden! Rain or shine, this Sol LeWitt piece is always brightening our day. // "Bands of Color in Various Directions," Sol LeWitt, American (1928-2007), 2001. Vinyl on aluminum. Collection of the Art Fund, Inc. at the BMA. Purchase with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. John Poynor and Bluff Park Art Association in honor of the Museum's 50th anniversary. AFI2.1999.1. Copyright The LeWitt Estate/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York.

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we’re highlighting pieces in our collection that bring us luck all year round. Take a look at 7 Lucky Works of Art in our collection, found from cultures across the globe!

1. Qing Dynasty Bowl
Chinese culture considers peaches very lucky, symbolizing longevity and good fortune. This bowl from the Qing dynasty (about 1700) certainly shows that the peach has stood the test of time!

2. Nigerian Horseshoe
While horseshoes are considered symbols of luck in our eyes, this horseshoe is used as currency in Nigeria.

3. Wedgwood Vase
The BMA is lucky to call itself the home of the largest collection of Wedgwood outside of England. We couldn’t get through this list without sharing a little bit of green – it is St. Patrick’s Day, after all!

4. Hotei Sculpture
Hotei is a Buddhist folk character who supposedly lived in China during the early 10th century. He wandered from town to town, never stopping in one place for long. He loved children and always seemed to have something for them in his large bag of possessions. He is now worshipped in Japan as the God of Good Fortune.

5. Chinese Vase
This vase is adorned with bats, a classical Chinese feng shui symbol for prosperity, and clouds, which symbolize good fortune and happiness.

6. Wedding Food Box
This piece is an elaborate covered wedding food box. On the inside of the box are four food compartments with plates, with characters saying “water, good fortune, east,” and one indecipherable word. Eating foods from these plates on a wedding day leads to a long, happy marriage.

7. Bands of Color in Various Directions
The treasure under this rainbow is our beautiful sculpture garden! Rain or shine, this Sol LeWitt piece is always brightening our day.